Using Images and Visualizations in Video Can Enhance Learning

Moia Rowsome Blog

How often do you look at an image to try to solve a problem or understand something complex? What about Google Maps or a subway station map? Or a How-To instruction manual with images to help you building your new book case? I know I use visualizations every day. They can serve to enhance our understanding and perception of a concept. Not only are they engaging, colorful, and even fun at times, they help the audience to assimilate information by making it more digestible and comprehensive. With 30hands Pro and Web, you can easily use images to explain a concept and energize a digital story. This can help your learners engage in the key concepts that you want them to absorb while avoiding overloading them with TMI (too much information!). Visualizations are everywhere in learning Never before have visualizations been more widely accessible than in the last decade. Sure, they have been used in books and presentations to explain a concept for a learner for a long time. However, with the explosion of technology, we have new tools to create and disseminate images, visualizations and animations for widespread consumption. This has opened up many new opportunities for educators and learners. Chief among these opportunities? Using images and visualizations in video. Learning from Video with 30hands The use of visualizations in a video to explain a concept is a game changer for teachers and learners. And this has only become easier with tools like 30hands Pro and Web. With narration and …

Creating Video Lessons Part 4 – Reducing Cognitive Load!

Moia Rowsome Blog

Ugh! Too much information. Welcome to part 4 of my blogs on creating engaging video lessons! So you have written your script and storyboarded your content. Now it’s time for the really creative process to begin! Enhancing and developing your slides with images and narration! This week, I’m going to be talking about how to use images to develop an engaging video lesson without overwhelming the learner and thus avoiding cognitive load. So we’ve all been there. That long, tired afternoon sitting opposite someone who has filled his or her presentation with diagrams, text and images, while they persist in talking over it. Although the information on the presentation might be excellent and what they are saying might be really good stuff, for the audience or learner it becomes overwhelming and very dull. So we disengage. But why does this happen? Is it just that we find it less interesting? Well, in the brain there is what we call a dual channel which we use to process information. This happens through the eyes and the ears. The eyes process information we see and the ears process information we hear. And it gets more complex than this. Because the eyes have to absorb images and read text, they can be subject to what is called the split attention effect. This happens when you have a set of images on a screen to portray a concept and then also text to read too. Your eyes are trying to read the text while working out what the images mean, so you become …