Learning and Staff Development in an Age of On-Demand

Eleanor Kennedy Blog

We live in a world where demand and expectations drive quality of living, or at least what we perceive to be quality. Missed last night’s episode of Game of Thrones? No worries (okay, except for the danger of spoilers). You can literally speak into your remote control and your television will catch you up. Want to know the weather forecast for the next week? Siri will have your answer in a matter of seconds. Our expectations are growing dramatically with each passing year as a result of this desire for immediate delivery of what we want. The on-demand culture has not only affected our home life but our professional lives, too. Today’s workforce is expected to be immediately productive on everything needed for the job. But is this realistic? How are we supposed to be 100% knowledgeable when each release of a product has a whole new batch of features and functionality? Often, the user interface and UX are dramatically changed. The reality is that the rapidly changing nature of technology is in conflict with our on-demand desires. We want everything now, but we can’t have that, since everything changes too quickly. To meet this demand, we need to have ways to teach and learn more quickly. Company hierarchies must be willing to encourage learning and development within their workforce to truly get the best possible results from staff. What do you mean when you say, “learning and development”? Learning and development is exactly what you think it is. It’s a way …

How to Make Training Stick: A 30hands Lesson

Eleanor Kennedy Blog

Studies show that only 10% of skills presented to employees during training sessions are retained after 6 months. The reasons for this is something we have already discussed here and here. It’s a frustrating reality for the corporate trainer but how do we incite change to ensure that our workforces are more productive than they were yesterday, more in line with company policies, and perhaps most importantly, happier in their job? It’s all about commitment, from the very top down to the trainer and trainee. It would be virtually impossible for any company to successfully train its staff without the support of its highest representative. According to TrainingIndustry.com, this involves a commitment to change, and this doesn’t start with the employee being trained. It starts with leadership, for without the commitment of leadership, there can be no real change. But there must also be a commitment to execute, something which takes time, energy and insistence to adopt new beliefs. And then there’s the commitment of time. New beliefs, behaviors, skills and competencies take time to develop – more time than most people believe is necessary. No matter how good the training is, the actual acquisition of competencies is not gained in a single training. Those competencies are gained in the field, over time. This last point is perhaps the most important. The ease and ability to revisit training, as well as meaningful follow-up assessment is perhaps the key to retained skills. With 30hands video, this is possible while ensuring vital company …

Video Training and Millennials: The Perfect Match?

Eleanor Kennedy Blog

“Let’s just stay in and watch Netflix”. How many times have we heard, or said, these words? Netflix, and indeed many other streaming sites, have become household names. They are how people pass the time, especially those who grew up in the early 21st century experiencing the rise of YouTube, Facebook, and other similar websites. But millennials aren’t just watching cat videos (sorry Olive!). They are now choosing to learn through online video, whether they realize it or not. Documentaries, quiz shows, TV shows… They all play a role in the ways in which these people now gain knowledge. With millennials now taking up a large percentage of today’s workforce, the opportunity of video in the office is perhaps bigger than ever. In fact, according to the Census Bureau, there are more than 80 million millennials living in the US, and other statistics show that their craving for online video as a preferred communication channel is growing.   This means the opportunity for video in corporate training is huge, as we have discussed before. It is even estimated that millennials spend 50 percent more time watching online video than TV. It’s clear that online video possesses an emotional power, so just how much more productive would a millennial worker be if they are trained through this medium?  We have already found out that corporate training costs the US economy approximately 70 billion dollars per year, with just a 10 percent skills retention rate. Why? Because of un-engaging training methods and a lack of …

Digital Storytelling and ISTE Standards for Students

Eleanor Kennedy Blog

Last year, we published a blog post which detailed the benefits of digital storytelling in the classroom. Digital storytelling is a fun and creative way for students of all ages to illustrate their knowledge and learn through the process. But digital storytelling also has many real world benefits. In fact, the process of creating a digital story forces learners to think analytically and visually, as well as practice their communication skills. These are traits which are also represented in ISTE’s standards for students and teachers, and with the 2017 conference just days away, we thought we would examine just how digital storytelling fits ISTE’s standards. Keep on reading! NOTE: Only ISTE standards that are representative of digital storytelling are included in this blog post. STUDENTS Standard 1: Empowered Learner Students leverage technology to take an active role in choosing, achieving and demonstrating competency in their learning goals, informed by the learning sciences. Digital storytelling empowers students to show what they know creatively and actively. For instance, if a learner is studying Photosynthesis in Science class, he or she can create a digital story illustrating all the steps involved. Not only does this show their competency, it helps them retain their knowledge and also provides a platform for them to go back and re-watch the lesson that they themselves created. Standard 2: Digital Citizen Students recognize the rights, responsibilities and opportunities of living, learning and working in an interconnected digital world, and they act and model in ways that are safe, legal and ethical. …