Digital Storytelling and ISTE Standards for Students

Eleanor Kennedy Blog

Last year, we published a blog post which detailed the benefits of digital storytelling in the classroom. Digital storytelling is a fun and creative way for students of all ages to illustrate their knowledge and learn through the process. But digital storytelling also has many real world benefits. In fact, the process of creating a digital story forces learners to think analytically and visually, as well as practice their communication skills. These are traits which are also represented in ISTE’s standards for students and teachers, and with the 2017 conference just days away, we thought we would examine just how digital storytelling fits ISTE’s standards. Keep on reading! NOTE: Only ISTE standards that are representative of digital storytelling are included in this blog post. STUDENTS Standard 1: Empowered Learner Students leverage technology to take an active role in choosing, achieving and demonstrating competency in their learning goals, informed by the learning sciences. Digital storytelling empowers students to show what they know creatively and actively. For instance, if a learner is studying Photosynthesis in Science class, he or she can create a digital story illustrating all the steps involved. Not only does this show their competency, it helps them retain their knowledge and also provides a platform for them to go back and re-watch the lesson that they themselves created. Standard 2: Digital Citizen Students recognize the rights, responsibilities and opportunities of living, learning and working in an interconnected digital world, and they act and model in ways that are safe, legal and ethical. …

Class Activity – Science Experiments

Gaby Charmont Blog

The Activity: A science experiment where students are able to practice The Scientific Method and truly learn the process. This activity is aimed to urge students to think scientifically in order to design and test their experiment with a good degree of accuracy. To describe their process, students will use 30hands Pro to reiterate the steps in their experiment through the audio tool and display photos on each slide simultaneously. The Level: This activity can be a planned experiment geared towards younger students or could be a challenge activity for older students by allowing them to complete an experiment of their own design. They will each come up with their own hypothesis, follow or design a procedure, and formulate conclusions based off of data collected. This will allow each student to explore and utilize the scientific method in order to complete experiments. The Procedure: Show this sample video to your Students to spark some ideas and have them run their own experiments. Students can map their slides with respect to the scientific method, plus making additional slides for each step of the procedure. Have your Students take a photo of each step before they complete it and their 30hands Video will be clear and outline their procedure. Students will be able to form conclusions based off of their data collection and could make suggestions on how they would improve their experiment or better test their hypothesis. Students will obtain practice with scientific experiments and simultaneously test the power of iterative creativity …

Time Travel and Aging

Eric Braun Blog

Last night, I watched a television show about time travel (Genius by Stephen Hawking), which I was compelled to watch due to my recent desire to explore black holes and quantum physics to find ways to make the topics more accessible to kids. When you talk about time travel, it’s impossible to ignore black holes, and I fell into the program by its gravitational pull. Like most intellectual endeavors, this exploration left me with clarity but also with more questions and more obscurity. First and foremost, I wondered, “Would one age faster or slower when traveling in time?” Let’s explore this a bit. The Genius Show The Genius show could also be named “Can you think like a genius?”. Hawking sets up challenges for 3 “average” people. The challenges are meant to lead them to conclusions made by great scientific minds to show that the concepts may not be as difficult to comprehend as one might think, just that the mind needs to be prepared in the right manner and, most likely, coached in the proper way. This comes across well and helps the viewer follow the same path. Although we do not know what was edited out, the participants grasp the concepts easily and we are shown that we can understand the concepts, too. And think about this: Why would this not be true? Many concepts that we fully grasp and believe today were not so obvious in the past. The Earth is round, not flat. The Earth rotates around …